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Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail

Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
© Chasing Light Media

Pikes Peak is the easternmost 14K ft peak in the United States, located 10 miles west of the city of Colorado Springs.

Climbing Pikes Peak: Barr Trail

Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
© Chasing Light Media

The Barr Trail begins on Pikes Peak’s east side at the Manitou Springs Trailhead at 6400 ft and ascends nearly 13 miles to the Pikes Peak Summit of 14,110 ft.

While the climb is considered a Class 1, it is a very long hike with over 7000 ft of elevation gain.

Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
© Chasing Light Media

The first 3 miles of Barr Trail are fairly steep, with the next 3 1/2 miles to Barr Camp much easier.  The trail is very well-marked, with markers along the way stating the distance remaining to both Barr Camp and the summit.

Climbing Pikes Peak: Barr Camp

Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
© Chasing Light Media

While Pikes Peak can be climbed in one day, an overnight at Barr Camp makes the climb more enjoyable.

Barr Camp is approximately 6.5 miles from the Manitou Springs Trailhead and is located at an elevation of 10,200 ft.

Barr Camp has both a campsite and bunkhouses with mattresses available.  Bunks must be reserved in advance and are in high demand during peak season. Breakfast is included and served at 7 am sharp.

Dinner is available for a small fee and served at 6 pm sharp. The spaghetti and garlic bread is fabulous after a long day of hiking.

Barr Camp has no potable water, but there is a nearby stream for obtaining water to be treated.

Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
Climbing Pikes Peak via Barr Trail
© Chasing Light Media

Climbing Pikes Peak: Barr Camp to the Summit

The Pikes Peak summit is an additional 6 miles from Barr Camp, with the trail climbing a little over 3,900 feet to the summit.

The views are wonderful as you climb the switchbacks up the mountain and finally reach the famous Golden Stairs. Only a few hundred more yards, and there’s the summit.

The people who drove or took the train up look at you a bit odd and we actually had people want to take their picture with us, not believing we climbed it.

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