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The Peace Catechism on Christian Principles by Philo Pacificus, 1816, pages 28-29

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Compiled and transcribed by Kimberli Faulkner Hull © Chasing Light Media
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The Peace Catechism on Christian Principles,
pages 28-29

The leaf shown at the bottom of page 29 was found in the gutter of the book.

Philo Pacificus, The Peace Catechism on Christian Principles (Boston: Wells and Lilly, 1816), p. 28-29; previously owned by Lydia Ann Chadwick (1807-1875); privately held by the Faulkner–Hull Collection.

Transcript

28

“Tertullian, next in order of time, in his Soldier’s Garland,” writes thus – “Can a soldier’s life be lawful, when Christ has pronounced, that he who lives by the sword, shall perish by the sword! Can one who professed the peaceable doctrine of the gospel be a soldier, when it is his duty not so much as to go to law ? And shall he, be instrumental in bringing others into chains, imprisonment, torment and death?”

Cyprian, in speaking on this subject, says – “When a single murder is committed, it shall be deemed perhaps a crime; but that crime shall commence a virtue, when committed under the shelter of publick authority; so that punishment is not rated according to the measure of guilt, but the more enormous the size of the wickedness is, so much the greater is the change for impunity.”

Lactantius says, “It can never be lawful for a righteous man to go to war, who warfare is in righteousness itself.”

“The names of Origin, Achelaus, Ambrose, Chrysotom, Jerome, and Cyril, may be added, as persons who gave it

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as their decided opinion, that it was unlawful for Christians to go to war.”

The early Christian writers believed that “The prophecy of Isaiah, which stated that men should turn their swords into plough shares, and their spears into pruning hooks, was then in the act of completion.”

Thus says Justin, “That the prophecy is fulfilled, you have good reason to believe; for we who in times past, killed one another, do not now fight our enemies.”

In support of the same opinion, Irenius says – “The Christians have changed their swords and their lances into instruments of peace, and they know not how to fight.”

Tertullian pleads that “the prophecy had been accomplished, as far as the practice of every individual is concerned, to whom it is applicable.”

Now, is it possible that this opinion could have prevailed, if the Christian had not refused to engage in war? From what possible ground could the opinion have resulted but this, that the Christian would not fight?

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Citing this page: Kimberli Faulkner Hull, compiler and transcriber, “The Peace Catechism on Christian Principles by Philo Pacificus, 1816, pages 28-29,” Chasing Light Media, Cool Adventures
( https://cooladventures.com/collection/peace-catechism-philo-pacificus-1816-p-28-29/ : published 2021); Philo Pacificus (Noah Worcester), The Peace Catechism on Christian Principles (Boston: Wells and Lilly, 1816), p. 28-29; previously owned by Lydia Ann Chadwick (1807-1875); privately held by the Faulkner–Hull Collection, Massachusetts.

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