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Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence, Kansas, Part 2

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Transcribed and compiled by Kimberli Faulkner Hull © Chasing Light Media
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Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook is from the military documents of Lt. Col. Ernest L. Faulkner, who was stationed at the Independence, Kansas Airbase 1942–1943. The yearbook can be viewed as a gallery and has also been transcribed, which is split into three parts:

Note: The book is tightly bound; if a clearer image of a service member is needed, please use the contact form with the soldier’s name and we will attempt to re-scan the image for you.

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook Transcription, Part 2

(Click image to enlarge)

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas
Independence Army Air Field,
Independence, Kansas
Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Richard M. Montgomery
Richard M. Montgomery,
Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding
Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas

HEADQUARTERS INDEPENDENCE ARMY AIR FIELD, INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS
HEADQUARTERS INDEPENDENCE ARMY AIR FIELD
INDEPENDENCE, KANSAS
May 12, 1943

To the Men of the Independence Army Air Field:

It has only been a few short months since our first troops arrived and began at once to make a home out of our Post. Followed shortly by ships, flying instructors, and cadets, we soon took on all the aspects of a real flying school. To date two classes of cadets have graduated and I can truthfully say they are as well equipped to successfully fulfill their mission as any Basic students anywhere.

The rapid strides which we have made in the development of our station has been wholly due to your unselfish efforts and continued interest as well as your burning desire to make this the best station in the Training Center. I congratulate you on your progress and I know that you will not rest until this war has been won and our right to live the American way assured. Ours is but a small part of the War Effort, but, nevertheless, the success of the whole undertaking hinges on the perfect fit­ ting of every cog in this great war machine.

We are proud of our Field, proud of our Air Force and proud of being able to play our rightful part toward ultimate victory.

Thank you for your cooperation, loyalty, and willingness.
You have been an inspiration to me.

R. M. Montgomery
Lieutenant Colonel, Air Corps Commanding

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

TEMPLE F. WINBURN
Lieutenant Colonel Executive Officer

HOWARD BRICKEY
Captain, Post Adjutant

JAMES D. DUNLAP
Lieutenant Colonel, Pos Quartermaster

LELAND C. TENNANT
Major, Administrative Inspector

JOSEPH P. CHAPMAN
Captain, Intelligence Officer, S-2

OSCAR B. HARRIS
Captain, S-4

WILLIAM E. DeHAVEN
Captain, Quartermaster Commissary, Sales Officer

JAMES E. FORSYTH
Captain, Post Surgeon

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

RICHARD H. GAINES
Captain Personnel Officer

JOSEPH GARRETSON, JR.
Captain, Public Relations Officer

JAMES 0. PAYNE
Captain, Base Technical Inspector

FRED C. T. SLAUSON
Captain, Post Operations Officer

WALTER J. STEUERNAGEL
Captain, Post Exchange Officer

STEWART S. WILLIAMS
Captain, Station Finance Officer

GRADY L. ALBIN
First Lieutenant Engineering Officer, 1087th BFTS

JOSEPH B. BINFORD
First Lieutenant, Commanding Officer 1089th Guard Squadron

JOSEPH 8. CUNNINGHAM
First Lieutenant, Assistant Base Technical Inspector

LLOYD W. DAHLQUIST
First Lieutenant, Post Chaplain

MICHAEL J. GALER
First Lieutenant, Assistant Base Technical Inspector

WARDEN N. HARTMAN, JR.
Captain, Post Engineer

GILBERT E. McDONALD
First Lieutenant, Base Adjutant

ROBERT F. McGUIRE
First Lieutenant Mess Officer, IC Officers’ Mess
FRED J. MITCHAM
First Lieutenant, Assistant Quartermaster Property Officer

CHARLES V. PERCIVAL
First Lieutenant, Mess Management Officer

CHARLES O. TAYLOR
First Lieutenant, Assistant Personnel Officer

JOSEPH A. WILSON
First Lieutenant Base Signal Office

SCHUYLER B. WORTHINGTON
First Lieutenant, Assistant Post Exchange Officer

JOHN C. ANDERSON
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Provost Marshall

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN W. ANDERSON, JR.
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Director of Physical Training

LEO C. AYERS
Second Lieutenant, Director of Physical Training

EMMETT N. BREEN
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Director of Physical Training

JOSEPH FLAA
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Base Signal Officer

JOHN W. GRAFF
Second Lieutenant, Base Chemical Officer

JAMES P. KATZ
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Engineering Office

THOMAS F. KNIGHT
Second Lieutenant, Base Classification Officer

ROBERT A. KORN
Second Lieutenant, Photographic Officer

PETER W. LANG
Second Lieutenant, Engineering Officer

CECIL B. LARSON
Second Lieutenant, Base Statistical Officer

FRIEND O. LOVE, JR.
Second Lieutenant, Engineering Officer

VICTOR S. RUX
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Personnel Officer

LEO C. SCULLY
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Administrative Inspector

PAUL A. SMITH
Second Lieutenant, Trial Judge Advocate
ROBERT WEINER
Second Lieutenant, Bond and Insurance Officer

EARL W. WINTERSTEIN
Second Lieutenant, Plant Protection Officer

ALLAN D. WITTERS
Second Lieutenant, Assistant Ordnance Officer

ALBERT W. WOOD
Second Lieutenant, Communications Officer

JOSEPH H. WYTHE, JR.
Second Lieutenant, Quartermaster Motor Transportation Officer

TRIGGS R. WHITE
Warrant Officer (j.g.), Assistant Base Technical Inspector

History of Independence Army Air Field
History of Independence Army Air Field

The story of this field differs sharply from that of many posts throughout the country in that its development and growth were the result of careful planning and long range plans rather than the mushroom growth so common to many fields.

In a sense, it is the story of the cooperation of the citizens of a city with their government to aid the expansion of our Air Forces, for, since its inception, the field has been fortunate in having the cooperation and hearty goodwill of the people of Independence.

The idea of an air field here began over three and one-half years ago when a group of airminded citizens of Independence decided that their town should cooperate in the air development then being undertaken. They secured approval from the CAA. then the principal party in air development, for a 640-acre port to be established here. The first attempts were coupled with the nearby city of Coffeyville, but soon this effort was discontinued and on the advice of the CAA some 30,000 acres were surveyed in this vicinity. The first site selected was turned down because it was located in a flood control project.

In October of 1941 and from that date on, all work was done through the Army engineers. City Engineer Glenn Hackmaster made the first survey, begun after the city had voted a $100,000 bond issue to finance the project. The survey began in October and took two months to complete. On December 1 the master plan was begun, which was completed and ready for submission in the latter part of January, 1942. This plan was approved by CAA officials on February 11, 1942.
In April the project was transferred from the CAA and placed under the WPA, which approved a $329,383 port for the city.

In this same month Army Engineers made their first check of the site, and following this check a group of airminded citizens went to Tulsa to confer with Colonel H. A. Montgomery, district head of the Army Engineers, who told them to proceed with their plans. A group of 40 Army engineers then made a complete examination of the site, remaining on the ground for a week, and a complete report was then sent to Randolph Field. Additional checks were then made on the schools, housing, and health facilities of the city to determine its ability to handle the crowd that would be stationed here in the event the field was built.

In the midst of these preparations and plans it was announced that the field would be built at Coffeyville, some 20 miles distant, and the hopes of the citizens who had worked so tirelessly for the field were dashed. However, they were reassured when word was sent from Tulsa that the field would be built.

On May 21, 1942, the city was advised to begin clearing the site of all utility wires and to complete all preliminary work in order that construction of the field could begin on June 17.
The official announcement that the field would be built came from Washington on May 27.
The first contractor to arrive at the field and begin work was Ottinger Brothers Construction Company, who began work on the flying field. Grading began on July 1 and the flying field was completed in April of 1943. The second contractor to arrive was J. 0. Burgwin Company, who constructed the base itself. This work was begun in August of 1942, and proceeded slowly, principally due to the difficulty in securing materials. The last contractor to assist in building the field was Jones Construction Company, which has just completed the WAAC housing project on the field.

The field area is 1,434 acres, with four auxiliary fields from eight to twenty miles distant.

The first officer to arrive at the new station was Lieutenant Colonel Tempie F. Winburn (then Maior). He was soon followed by additional members of the official staff, including the commanding officer of the field, Lieutenant Colonel Richard M. Montgomery.

The first troops arrived on December 22, 1942, and had Christmas dinner on the new field. No time was lost in beginning the operation for which the field was intended.

The first contingent of cadets, Class 43-F, arrived on February 17, and since that time classes have been arriving and departing on schedule.

The Director of Training for the field is Lieutenant Colonel Ralph B. Lister, and under his direction the field has had an enviable safety record to date.

Since its inception the field has enjoyed splendid relations with the citizens of Independence. A large and exceedingly well patronized U. S. O. has been established in the city, and the planting of shrubbery around the barracks has also been done by the citizens as an evidence of their goodwill.

The field is fortunate in that it has many of the original officers who arrived here at its activation still on the post, as well as many of the original cadre of enlisted men.

It is the determination of everyone on the field to continue to merit the confidence of the citizens of the city and of the country by continuing to do their duty well.

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas Department of Training
DEPARTMENT OF TRAINING

RALPH B. LISTER
Lieutenant Colonel, Director of Training

JAMES H. WILLIFORD
Major, Air Inspector

GEORG, E T. COWGER
Captain, Director of Flying

FREDERICK J. HOLL
Captain, Director of Ground School

JAMES T. GRAY
First Lieutenant, Commandant of Cadets

RODERICK S. HOWARD
Second Lieutenant, School Secretary

HARRY L. EVANS, JR.
Captain, Squadron Commander, Fourth Training Squadron

EDGAR G LEIMBACHER
Captain, Squadron Commander, Second Training Squadron

RICHARD H. WHITAKER
Captain, Squadron Commander, Third Training Squadron

HENRY H. REEVES
Captain, Squadron Commander, First Training Squadron

Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence Army Air Field, Independence, Kansas, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS
FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS

ASHLEY N. DENTON, JR., Captain

GLENN D. SCHNEIDER, Captain

JOHN G. BRADLEY, First Lieutenant

GEORGE E. BUCKINGHAM, First Lieutenant

MYRON A. CHRISTENSEN, First Lieutenant

RICHARD D. COLEMAN, First Lieutenant

MILTON M. CONNELL, JR., First Lieutenant

WILLIAM A. CUMMINS, First Lieutenant

WILBUR L. DUNN, First Lieutenant

IRVIN D. GENTRY, First Lieutenant

JAMES C. GILMORE, First Lieutenant

EDWARD B. HAMPTON, First Lieutenant

ARTHUR H. JAMES, First Lieutenant

DAVID C. JOLLY, First Lieutenant

ROBERT D. MACK, First Lieutenant

HOWARD S. MAUGER, First Lieutenant

PAUL F. PATCH, First Lieutenant

RAYMOND J. PETROSHIUS, First Lieutenant

CARLTON E. SELPH, JR., First Lieutenant

JAMES S. SHAPPELL, First Lieutenant

CLARENCE J. SIKKEMA, First Lieutenant

JAMES E. SMALL, First Lieutenant

HAROLD R. VANN, First Lieutenant

Independence Army Flying School 1943, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS
FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS

REX H. RITTER, Second Lieutenant

CHARLES D. ROBINSON, Second Lieutenant

HAROLD E. ROWE, Second Lieutenant [Handwritten – Deceased]. Note: Harold E. Rowe and a cadet in training, Randolph H. Boyen, were killed in a crash on 23 Aug 1943 near Cherryvale, Kansas.

HAROLD E. SARGENT, Second Lieutenant

JOHN J. SAWYER, Second Lieutenant

RICHARD K. SHELBY, Second Lieutenant

WILLIAM C. SLOCUM, JR., Second Lieutenant

JOSEPH B. SMALL, Second Lieutenant

WILLIAM J. SMITH, Second Lieutenant

DAVID H. SUTHERLAND, Second Lieutenant

MILLARD W. TULEY, Second Lieutenant

THOMAS L. TWYFORD, Second Lieutenant

HASKELL L. WALKER, Second Lieutenant

IRVING G. WILLIAMS, Second Lieutenant

HENRY C. WRIGHT, Second Lieutenant

MEDICAL

STEWART BARKDULL, Captain, Dental Surgeon

RAY A. EADS, Chief of Out-Patient Department, Station Hospital

JAMES E. FORSYTH, Captain, Post Surgeon

JOSEPH N. ALBINO, First Lieutenant, Assistant to Dental Surgeon Station Hospital

EDWARD I. BLOOM, First Lieutenant, Medical Officer

Independence Army Flying School 1943

ROBERT C. GEARY, First Lieutenant, Assistant to Dental Surgeon

TURNEY LESTER KIRKWOOD, First Lieutenant, Medical Officer

SYDNEY A. LERNER, First Lieutenant, Chief of Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Department

ARETUS D. MARTIN, First Lieutenant, Chief of Medical Service

ROBERT PARK, First Lieutenant, Flight Surgeon

JOSEPH H. PRINTZ, First Lieutenant, Chief of X-ray and Assistant Chief of Surgery

JOE B. SELMAN, First Lieutenant, Assistant to Chief of Dental Surgery

THOMAS M. WISE, First Lieutenant, Station Veterinarian

CHARLES P. PICKETT, Second Lieutenant, Medical Supply Officer

JOHN B. RICHARDSON, Second Lieutenant, Registrar

NURSES

EMMA LEONE BRITTON, First Lieutenant, Chief Nurse

JOSEPHINE C. BLICK, Second Lieutenant

MARIE B. BLICK, Second Lieutenant

MAMIE Y. DIXON, Second Lieutenant

ALICE M. DUSTMAN, Second Lieutenant

OLIVE M. FISHER, Second Lieutenant

LUCILLE M. LARSON, Second Lieutenant

VIRGINIA F. MILLS, Second Lieutenant

WANDA A. SHOLTS, Second Lieutenant

Independence Army Flying School 1943, GROUND SCHOOL and OFFICERS

GROUND SCHOOL OFFICERS

CONRAD BANSPACH, JR., First Lieutenant

ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS, First Lieutenant

NORMAN F. THORPE, First Lieutenant

MORTON P. BRUNIG, Second Lieutenant

ANTONIO J. CEDDIA, JR., Second Lieutenant

GUIDO CHIESA, Second Lieutenant, Link Trainer Officer

PAUL D. ELROD, Second Lieutenant

DAVID JONES, Second Lieutenant

JAMES W. TAYLOR, Second Lieutenant

DONALD R. TORBERT, Second Lieutenant

WILLIAM D. WESSEL, Second Lieutenant

SUB-DEPOT OFFICERS

JOHN H. BELL, Major, Commanding Officer

JOHN A. DAUGHERTY, Captain, Supply Officer

MILLARD R. NEWLAND, Captain, Engineering Officer

VERNON F. ALBRECHT, Second Lieutenant, Assistant Supply Officer

ERNEST L. FAULKNER, Second Lieutenant, Assistant Engineer Officer

Independence Army Flying School 1943, Activities
Activities
Independence Army Flying School 1943
Soldiers of the Sky
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Soldiers of the Sky

A cadet or a soldier arriving at Independence Army Air Field, whatever his interest may have been before joining the colors, soon becomes imbued with the zeal and the spirit that must be maintained by a military organization in order to attain the very maximum of efficiency. Coming to Independence Field for training the cadet is well on the road toward being a good soldier and officer. They realize, too, that what they learn at Independence Field may decide the great air battles of the future. Uncle Sam’s cadets, secure in the knowledge that they are the best trained flyers in the world, go about their business with a cocky grin and a chip on their shoulders, they can play hide and seek with clouds, and look down on mountains, knowing that when he hits the big show he’ll fly the best and fastest planes on earth.

Independence Army Flying School 1943, The Links
The LINKS
Independence Army Flying School 1943, IT IS SCHOOL AGAIN FOR THESE SOLDIERS!
IT IS SCHOOL AGAIN FOR THESE SOLDIERS! .

The Links

Flying blind! The Link trainer teaches a student pilot to rely on his instru­ments, not on his sensual reactions while in actual flight and under adverse con­ditions. A mass of instruments, these little machines go through all the mo­tions of a real plane and give the stu­dent pilot “under the hood” plenty to think about.

IT IS SCHOOL AGAIN FOR THESE SOLDIERS! Future fliers must learn to identify aircraft of all nations at a glance, enemy or friendly. Familiar with the plane, the gunner can judge his range by its size in the ring sight and knows when to fire.

Independence Army Flying School 1943, Maintenance
Maintenance
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Maintenance

Maintenance For every man in the air, there are fifteen men on the ground whose functions are to keep ’em flying. To them the expression, “Keep ‘Em Flying,” is more than a patriotic catchword. Upkeep of planes and speedy handling of routine work is important.

Independence Army Flying School 1943, Military Police Guardmount, Signal.
Military Police Guardmount, Signal
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Weather Identification.
Weather Identification.
Independence Army Flying School 1943
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Obstacle Course
Obstacle Course
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Doctoring an Army
Doctoring an Army
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Making Soldiers Out of Men
Making Soldiers Out of Men

Doctoring an Army

Doctoring an Army Seeing that the soldiers remain in good health and treating the sick, is an important job of the Medical Department and as usual the men in white carry on in khaki with characteristic patience and sympathy. The Army gives every man the best of care. They have only to make an appointment to receive free treat­ment from personnel skilled in all phases of Medical Science.

Making Soldiers Out of Men A complete system of physical exercises of all kinds is planned for Uncle Sam’s soldiers in order to condition their bodies for the strenuous life that faces them–long, hard gruelling work, that will fit them for the problems that will arise on the foreign field.

Independence Army Flying School 1943, In the Offices
In the Offices
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Warehouse
Warehouse
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Food for Hungry Soldiers
Food for Hungry Soldiers
Independence Army Flying School 1943, Food for Hungry Soldiers
Independence Army Flying School 1943, photos

Citing this page: Kimberli Faulkner Hull, transcriber and compiler, “Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook, Independence, Kansas, Part 2” Chasing Light Media, Cool Adventures 
( https://cooladventures.com/collection/independence-army-flying-school-1943-part-2/: published 2020); Independence Army Flying School 1943 Yearbook (Independence, Kansas, 1943), from the collection of Lt. Col. Ernest L. Faulkner; privately held by the Faulkner–Hull Collection, Massachusetts.

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